17 July, 2019 – Episode 730 – What is a Constant?

July 18th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Interview w/ Dr. Lukas Pasteka, Another Constant?, Neuralink Tech, Ancient Breastfeeding, Zombie Ant Fungus, Eat Bugs, Bugs In Pain, Rubik’s AI, Antarctic Snow Blowers, Radioactive islands, Runner’s Elbow, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

Children
Small statured humans, young in age and high in energy.
They like sugar, playing with things, being curious about everything…
And, they have visions of the future!
Sometimes these visions are very different than the futures they actually encounter upon growing up…
The world it seems only needs so many cowboy-princess-astro-pirates
What the world does need of course is science…
And lots of it.
Science is a field for the curious
Science is all about playing with things.
And, science runs on visions of the future like a hopped up 7 year old with a fist full of pixie stix.
If there is one thing you can inspire the next generation with that they can relate to the most
It is science.
Because, at its core,
it is a childlike curiosity,
an active imagination…
And above all else,
a drive to prove that those who came before
didn’t really know everything after all.
And, nowhere else is that more a parent than
This Week in Science,
Coming Up Next…

First up, an interview!

We spoke with Dr. Lukas Pasteka, Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry at Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia about his work investigating the fundamental constants of the universe.

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“I didn’t die (or go blind, or have my bones twisted, or become sterile) from Polio, measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, or influenza today. Yay!
–Mae Harmon Archer”

Let’s continue with some science news…

Another Constant?
Rather than be a tie-breaker, a third estimate of the Hubble constant has delivered a THIRD value provocatively between other values previously estimated for the expansion of our universe.

Neuralink Tech
Another Musk endeavor, a company called Neuralink is making waves this week with a presentation and paper detailing their efforts to improve BMI technology, and get to human trials within the year.

Australopithecus africanus mothers breastfed their infants
Teeth tell the tale of nutrition for our ancient ancestors.

Secrets of a zombie ant fungus revealed!
It’s all in the muscles, not the mind.

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Eat a bug, it’s good for you!
Antioxidant levels look great in edible invertebrates. That, combined with the reduced carbon footprint, mean eating bugs could be in our future – and perhaps should be.

But… it turns out they can feel chronic pain
Bugs in pain could give us clues on chronic pain in humans. Thanks, fruit flies! Now lemme get you an Advil…

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Rubik’s Solved By AI
A deep learning algorithm has solved the Rubik’s cube puzzle using the least number of moves.

Antarctic Snow Blowers
I’m all for solutions, but this one is just dumb.

Radioactive islands
The Marshall Islands are more radioactive than Fukushima or Chernobyl.

What’s in a ‘bow?
Why do we walk with arms out straight, but run with arms bent?? We may never know…

Netflix and Chimp
Chimpanzees like each other more after hanging out and watching movies.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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10 July, 2019 – Episode 729 – Science Freestyle!

July 11th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Interview w/ rap artist Baba Brinkman, Crab Power Rays, Molecule Storage, Toothy History, Ancient Human Skulls, Inherited Memory, Spider Aggression, Extinction Revival, Smells Like Love, Long live corn!, A Hot World, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

The following program frequently contains information
considered objectionable by the United States Government and the companies they represent.
So subversive is this information
that even the top scientists working within government who produced this information…
are not allowed to speak publicly about it…
In fact, when the Scientists of the US Geological Survey attempted in March make this information public
It was rewritten by administration agents to remove any mention of global warming’s consequences.
Department of Agriculture scientists have seen similar measures used against their findings.
As have the EPA, and NASA…
While not all the information contained in the following program is of this objectionable nature,
Listeners are warned in advance that simply knowing the facts about global warming
Makes you a political and ideological threat to the wealth and welfare
of momentarily powerful interests.
That said, we will continue to speak science to power because
From the big bang to the latest advances
We got more science news than Chinese zoos got pandas
Here on,
this week in science,
Coming up next…

First up, an interview!

This week we spoke with rap artist, science communicator, and award-winning playwright, Baba Brinkman about his life as a science rapper. He is most well-known for his series of “Rap Guides”, the most recent being the Rap Guide to Consciousness, and has a new album of songs out now. The video he mentioned at the end of this week’s episode is here.

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“It helped me plan my vacations well in advance so I could come to Argentina to watch the eclipse.
Also, no polio.
–Rodrigo Roesler”

Let’s continue with some science news…

Crab Power Rays
Water tanks buried deep beneath the Tibetan Plateau have detected the highest energy photons ever seen coming from the Crab nebula.

Molecule Storage
Brown University scientists have demonstrated a proof of concept experiment for data storage using small molecules contained in the metabolome.

The tooth is out there…
Some current humans have Denisovan traits!

Oldest human?
The oldest human fossil ever found outside of Africa just got a whole lot older.

Study finds psychiatric diagnosis to be ‘scientifically meaningless’
The take-home is that psychiatry needs new diagnostic methods.

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Memory can be inherited
Even if mom just wants to avoid those darn wasps!

Rhinos, mammoths, it’s all on its way!
The first step in reviving extinct species has proven possible. But where to go from here?

Spiders can be aggressive, but it just isn’t their fault!
They can’t help the fact that growing up alone is a tough lot. So tough in fact, they forget how to be friendly. Yikes…

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Smells Like Love
Female lampreys respond to an odorant molecule in sperm called Spermine. Researchers hope they can use this to limit reproduction in this species that can be a pest in some river systems.

20+ year old tooth in man’s foot gives valuable science data
Just the kind of headline you would expect from “Florida Man.”

It’s getting hotter in here!!!
Everywhere.

Long live corn!
Some 600 genes for longevity have been discovered that might influence harvests of all cereal grains.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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03 July, 2019 – Episode 728 – Treating OCD

July 8th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Interview w/ Dr. Susanne Ahmari, HIV Removal, Probing Atmospheres, Lab burgers, Food safety?, Turtles Hearts, Pro-biotics For Bats, Mold In Space!!!, Exercise Your Brain!, Reading Robots, Veggie Crocs, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

The fourth of July!
Independence day…
The day that we celebrate as a nation with great pride and a plethora of pyrotechnics…
In memory of the illegal immigrants who, despite the odds…
Declared land stolen from a native population by the British empire
to be theirs instead…
Yes, our founding immigrant fathers and mothers had no right to the land by law…
And, by defying a tyrannical monarch they were by definition illegal trespassers in their own homes…
They should have been deported back to the many, many, many nations they had fled in search of freedom…
But instead, they stood tall.
Spoke half-truths to power.
And declared America to be a nation of free people!
Except for the negro and of course not extending all rights to women…
But to be fair…
these were newcomers to America.
Sometimes immigrants need time to adjust to a new society.
First settlers could barely feed themselves,
and needed the assistance of the native population to survive.
And, the founding immigrants brought with them more than a few cultural hang ups
that needed to be worked out over a few hundred years of assimilation…
It would be a 144 years between 1776 and 1920 when women first got the vote…
Whereas, in most native American cultures women had either
an equal or in some cases the only voice on internal tribe issues…
like choosing the chief!
So as we celebrate this fourth of July let us not forget that this is a nation of immigrants…
And that independence day is a day of declaring yourself free from a foreign nation
And finding a home instead…
here on
This week in science,
coming up next…

First up, an interview!

This week we spoke with Dr. Susanne Ahmari
Dr. Ahmari is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She has an MD and PhD from Stanford University, and completed her post-doctoral work at Columbia University. She studies the neural mechanisms underlying obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“Science has gotten me a job in a cytology lab and I’m so excited to start!!! Also the promise of a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease makes me giddy.
–Jessica Ridulfo”

Let’s continue with some science news…

HIV Removal
Mice have been completely cured of HIV using a method involving slow-release anti-retroviral drugs and the CRISPR-
Cas9 gene-editing technology, according to a study published in Nature Communications this week. Is it a proof of concept toward treatment?

Probing Atmospheres
NASA scientists have taken a good look at the atmosphere of a distant planet called Gliese 3470b finding it contains hydrogen and helium, kind of like our sun.

Lab burgers
How to best sell lab-grown meat to the public?

Food safety?
Who is making sure things we eat are safe?

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Who needs oxygen, anyhow?
Not snapping turtles, but definitely me…

Pro-biotics give bats another chance
White nose? More like white no’s with some pro-biotics!!

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Mold In Space!!!
Spores can withstand “stupid” amounts of radiation.

Exercise Your Brain!
OHSU researchers have discovered a small molecule that gets turned up in the hippocampus of the mouse brain with a moderate amount of exercise. This molecule is involved in the creation of dendritic spines on the membrane of neurons, which might mean that it can help prime your brain for learning.

Robots reading text books can write the next version
Predictive algorithms are predicting our science discoveries.

Never smile at a crocodile
Except for 200 million years ago. Back then, that crocodile was a vegetarian, so it would have been quite safe…

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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26 June, 2019 – Episode 726 – The Daily Animal News Show!

June 27th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Neanderthal Tech, Mammalian Radiation, Barefoot Walkers, Rolling Poop, We Make Mosquitoes, Robots Make Jobs!, Glia Glue, Big Bird Bones, Nar-what?, Cicada Hallucinations, Hot Europe, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

No matter what…

Be positive.
Yes life isn’t always a bowl of cherries, but so what?
You could have a bowl of cherries right now if you wanted it…
but you don’t… and why? Because of the pits.
Even a bowl of cherries has a down side if you look for it.

So be positive!
Because tomorrow you might die suddenly and unexpectedly…
And if you have not been positive those around you will say that you didn’t really like it here anyway…
Be Positive!
Because even when things are bad they could be much worse

So be positive!
Because the universe doesn’t actually care if you are not happy

So be positive!
Because it doesn’t matter if you are not.

So you might as well just look on the bright side…
After all, there are things to look forward to.
And a great number of those things are about to come your way
On this week in science…
Coming up next.

First up, some science news!

Neanderthal Tech
Neanderthals were no saps, but they used pine sap or resin as a glue for their tools.

Mammals were all that and a bag of chips while T-rex was still roaming
Mammalian radiation and domination didn’t wait for dinosaurs to go extinct, according to new fossil evidence.

Barefoot walkers have tough feet but sense the ground just as well
Barefoot walkers build up tough calluses on the soles of their feet without losing their sensitivity unlike wearing shoes. Hypothesis that hard calluses transmit pressure without dampening them.

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Rolling poop, on a wind and a prayer
Dung beetles use multiple variables to move about their landscape, including wind direction!

Just like the bacteria, mosquitoes are becoming monsters of our own design.
Pesticide resistant mosquitoes are a thing. Oops.

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

Our guest host from The Daily Tech News Show, Roger Chang, tells us about the benefits he gets from science.

Let’s continue with some more science news…

Big Bird Bones
Bones from a bird almost as big as a polar bear have been discovered in Europe on the Black Sea.

Robots Make Jobs!
“Up to 20 million manufacturing jobs around the world could be replaced by robots by 2030, according to analysis firm Oxford Economics. But, however, increasing automation will also boost jobs and economic growth, it added.”

Glia, previously thought to just be brain glue, actually kind of a big deal.
The glia may be responsible for the impulse to give up on something that isn’t working – which is a really important thing to be able to do, it turns out!

Nar-what?
A whale specimen was discovered that turned out to be a hybrid Narwhal and Beluga whale, or Narluga.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

What do fungal hallucinogens and cicada genitals have in common?
They are part of a horrifying “salt shaker of death”

Heat is on
An unprecedented heatwave is underway in Europe.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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15 June, 2019 – Episode 725.5 – Live from the Interplanetary Festival!

June 26th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Salty Water?, Aging Humans, Aging Bats, Sinking Seashells, Ancient Weed, Beewolf Business, Mantis Shrimp Armor, Mousey Peer Pressure, Interview w/ Dr. Jennifer Dunne, Venomous Medicine?, Robo-helper, Impossible Pterodactyls, LEGO Satellites?, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

For all the certainty with which humanity sets its course
and seizes opportunities where it can…
We rarely contemplate our destination.

Allowing far too often…
For tendencies of mankind’s impulses to push us forward
Fulfilling the immediate needs
Of safety and security
Comfort and greed
The next steps taken by humanity
far too often are in reaction to where the last steps have left us standing
As if we have no destination in mind.

When seen from afar the course of humanity…
Often looks more like the drunken stagger of an infant
than the steady steps of a progressing society

And when we have no destination in mind…
We choose one by default.
And so…
This world of changing climate… is the destination we have chosen
Melting ice caps… is the destination we have chosen
RIsing sea waters… is the destination we have chosen
Flooded cities… is the destination we have chosen.
Death of the coral reefs,
the source of half the oxygen we breathe… is the destination
Agricultural drought and the ensuing famine… is the destination
Extreme weather events, of all sorts, affecting everywhere…
is the destination we have chosen by not choosing

And as we stagger off the right foot, and catch ourselves with the left…
We might turn this drunken stumble of a society in a direction of our own choosing…
One that sets a course with a destination in mind…
One that will ultimately lead us all to
This Week in Science
Coming Up Next…

First up, some science news!

Salty Water?
Thanks to Hubble, we now think there is salty water under the icy surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa increasing the likelihood that its hidden oceans may contain life.

Aging Humans
A study in Aging Cell looked at the question of whether human cells follow the same program for aging throughout life, and discovered that at least in neuron and muscle cells, they switch away from maintenance around age 60.

Aging Bats
Turns out that many species of bats are strangely long-lived for their small sizes. A new study didcovered that at the point in life when genes for health are getting turned off in most species, these bats are turning them up.

Sea shells by the sea shore
Climate change is affecting sea levels, and our access to ancient archaeological sites.

Origins of cannabis cultivation
The weed goes way back.

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

How did the beewolf keep their food from going bad?
Hint – it’s not a vacuum sealer from QVC!

Mantis shrimp at it again! This time with space age armor.
OK, should we just send them into space instead? They seem well equipped…

Peer pressure at its finest
The science of… You like cumin? OK, so do I!

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

Let us know what science has done for you lately by leaving us a message on our Facebook page!

Let’s continue with some more science news…

Interview w/ Dr. Jennifer Dunne, Professor and Vice President for Science at the Santa Fe Institute. Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Pacific Ecoinformatics and Computational Ecology Lab. Editor at Ecology Letters and the Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution, Oxford University Press.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Venomous Medicine?
Compounds discovered in scorpion venom show promise as potent antibacterial agents.

Robo-helper
A new algorithm might make robots better at sharing space with humans.

Impossible pterodactyls
They flew how?

Satellites are one part lyft, another part Lego.
This “ride sharing” and interlocking satellite method could change the way we go to space!

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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19 June, 2019 – Episode 726 – Can Plants Sneeze?

June 20th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Light In The Dark, Earth Twins Activate!, Cool Zebra Stripes, Emotional Support Fish, Dog Expressions, Hyena Travel Plan, Information Gluttony, Sneezing Plants?, Mind Control, Heart Alexa, SMELLY DINOS, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

The tides go in and out,
the world goes round and round,
and we try to predict what will happen each new day…
But sometimes, there are unexpected events that take us by surprise…
What we do with those surprises defines who we are, and what we will be tomorrow.
Tonight’s surprise is that Justin is somewhere in America where there still is no Wi-Fi…
So, with that surprise we will bring what science we can,
and what spirited discussion we may.
So pull up a chair,
relax and listen to this very special episode of…
This Week in Science! Coming up next…

First up, some science news!

Light In The Dark
UC Davis geneticists have mapped the notoriously hard-to see portion of DNA called the centromere discovering ancient genes that go back hundreds of thousands of years.

Earth Twins Activate!
Two exoplanets of approximately Earth-size have been discovered orbiting a small red dwarf star at what we think is within the habitable zone.

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

The zebra stripe plot thickens!
As does their black hair in the heat! Temperature regulation may have something to do with those stripes after all. We may never know why a zebra has stripes at this rate!!

Where’s my emotional support human??
Being separated from your preferred mate could cause you to act more pessimistic, if you are a fish…

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“Thank you for your wonderful show. When I discovered it by accident on a radio station I began to tune your show on my School Bus. Your show has helped me spread the joy of science to children while transporting children around my school district. Many of the children I transport are not in programs geared toward teaching STEM.

My current Summer School Bus radio does not pick up the radio station you are broadcasted on weekly, but I will be overcoming this problem and plan to replay your podcasts on my bus’s archaic equipment for my kids! I just wanted you guys to know your show has led to children; often discouraged openly from developing an interest in science or math; to discussing and even researching on their own science subjects that sparked their curiosity! Thank you so much for your show!
–Laura Mumma”

Let’s continue with some more science news…

Dog Expressions
We probably made dogs who they are.

Hyena Travel Plan
How did Hyenas get from Asia to America? A toothy find suggests the last ice age might have given them a bridge.

Information Gluttony
Your brain reacts to information in the same way as it does to food, money, and drugs according to a new study out of Berkeley.

Sneezing Plants?
Water droplets that catapult due to surface tension might be capable of spreading disease.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Mind Control
Carnegie Mellon engineers have improved the accuracy of non-invasive brain-computer-interfaces in controlling a robotic arm.

Heart Alexa
University of Washington researchers have made it possible for in-home systems like Alexa to respond to a specific type of breathing that occurs during cardiac arrest.

SMELLY DINOS
Dinosaurs likely had a great sense of smell! And they would have told you to put on deodorant, too, Karen!

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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12 June, 2019 – Episode 725 – Are We Kidding About Science?

June 13th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Worm Behavior, Ancestor Cells, Mass in the Moon, Smart Bees, Elephant Nose, Twins No More, Making Universal Blood, Artery Hardening, Feather Lice Lives, Research Ban, Contagious Yawning, Sleep Schedules, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

They say that the children are our future,
but in order for that to be true,
there has to be a future to begin with…
I’m not surprised when children get upset hearing about the world that they will be left…
so in order for us to nurture the curiosity and promise of what could be the greatest generation yet,
we have to do our best to right wrongs,
set the stage,
and leave nature, beauty, and creativity for these generations to come.
The first step preserving this future is to foster that same curiosity by encouraging questions,
celebrating individuality,
and setting the stage for wholesome education – that is accessible to everyone.
Let’s start all of that, by exploring this weeks discoveries on…
This Week in Science!
Coming up next…

First up, some science news!

Worm Behavior
Worms use small RNA molecules to pass learned behaviors on to their offspring according to two new studies.

Ancestor Cells
A comparison of the transcriptomes of sponges to single-celled organisms suggests that multi-cellular organisms didn’t evolve from single-celled organisms, but instead from something more similar to stem cells.

Mass in the Moon
What put an unexpected mass in the moon?

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Bees are smarter than you.
Bees have shown to exhibit some basic number symbol recognition, reminding us once again that these stripey buddies might not be trying to hurt you, they might instead be trying to tutor you in math.

The elephant nose knows.
Elephants can smell a larger snack, sight unseen. Now that is a superpower I could get behind!!

Join us at the Interplanetary Festival!

We’ll be podcasting LIVE at 4:15pm Mountain Time on Saturday, June 15th. Come see us at the festival!

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

Kai tells us about how science helped him with a school report on snow leopards.

Let’s continue with some more science news…

The donut of my sister is not my friend.
Despite genetic identicality, twins have very different food responses, and no surprise, microbiomes.

More Blood!
Maybe gut bacteria can help us produce more blood for transfusions.

Hard Arteries
A decade of research has discovered that a molecule normally involved in intracellular DNA repair is responsible for calcification and hardening of the arteries, AND that a common antibiotic can reverse that damage.

How do you get lice to reproduce on tape?
Hint: the answer is not to ask nicely…

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Fetal Research Ban
A new policy makes research involving fetal tissue at the NIH impossible, and NIH funding for such research much
more difficult to get.

Contagious Yawning
A new study adds to the evidence that yawning is useful for brain cooling.

Go To Sleep
Irregular sleep is linked to metabolic disorders.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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05 June, 2019 – Episode 724 – Mind the Gap, Science!

June 6th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Baby Planets!, Here Kitty!, Curious Viruses, Interview w/ Dr. Matthew Stanley on Einstein, Mole Rats Feel No Pain, Science Sponges, Elephant Footprints, Blood Guts And Autism, Lost Tribe Teeth, You Should Run, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

Most of the things we have invented over the last hundred thousand years of humans on the earth…
Are still with us in some form…
The wheel, the fish hook, the elastic band and touch screens to name just a few…
Fire on the other hand…
is much older than the last hundred thousand years.
It is a technology older than current humans…
by a million years or more…
When a thing is useful,
when knowledge has a benefit…
It is preserved,
handed down.
As if knowledge were a living organism…
Reproducing through teaching, sharing and learning,
the exchange of information,
From one generation to the next.
And, like any living thing…
it can also die.
If we fail to teach…
Or if we fail to learn…
We humans look at the world of today as if it is a permanent place.
It is not.
It will change.
Based on the lessons we have learned and the new discoveries we make…
The world will change for the better.
And it can also change…
by the knowledge we fail to nurture in the next generation…
For the worse.
Like any living thing,
knowledge needs a healthy environment…
Like the one between your ears.
And a something good to munch on…
Like this week in science
Coming up next…

First up, some science news!

Baby Planets!
Mind the gap! Two new exoplanets support the protoplanetary-disk hypothesis of planetary formation.

Here Kitty!
Yale researchers have found a signal that predicts when a qubit is about to make a quantum jump, which allows them to observe the jump and reverse it. This potentially will be useful in correcting errors in quantum computing.

Giant virus with a curious gene
A search of over 8000 giant viruses unearthed the viral production of an enzyme called cytochrome P450, which plays a role in human health and could lead to new drug targets for disease treatment.

Let’s continue with an interview…

We were joined by science historian, Dr. Matthew Stanley, to discuss his recent book, ‘Einstein’s War: How relativity triumphed amid the vicious nationalism of World War I.Dr. Stanley is a Professor at the NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study. He teaches and researches the history and philosophy of science. He holds degrees in astronomy, religion, physics, and the history of science and is interested in the connections between science and the wider culture. He is also one of the hosts of the ‘What The If?‘ podcast.

Join us at the Interplanetary Festival!

We’ll be podcasting LIVE at 4:15pm on Saturday, June 15th. Come see us at the festival!

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“Hi guys, my name is Johnny Blindman Hampson. I am blind and I just love your show. For sure, it makes me look good in front of people. For sure, and gives me lots of toys to play with. If you want to see much more of me just look for me on YouTube. Just search for ‘Blindman Cyber Cave Show’ and ‘Johnny Plays the Keys’. Thank you, guys! Hope this gets on your show. I only have one person watching me so far. Well, see you or hear you later. From Johnny Blindman and his computer Lacyia. Love you!
{lacyia} done by voice only. very cool what I can do thanks to science!”

And, now it’s time for Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Mole rats have it all… except perhaps good looks?
Mole rats give us a new clue into pain relief. Why? Oh, just because they CAN’T FEEL PAIN. That’s it, the mole rats will outlive us all!

Using sponges for science!
Sponges (the animals) could be DNA goldmines of information on underwater communities. This realization could revolutionize the way we monitor aquatic ecosystems!!

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

What do frogs and elephants have to do with each other??
It turns out, frogs use elephant tracks as “condos.” Add it to the list of reasons to save these gentle giants!

Autism Bugs?
Mice given fecal transplants from people with autism developed autism-like symptoms in a study published last week.

Young Blood
According to a study in PNAS, young blood is enriched in multiple factors that directly promote synaptic connectivity between neurons.

Club Microbe Med
Just living with young mice can rejuvenate the gut immune response in old mice. Fecal transplants work, too.

Lost tribe of humans
Turns out dead men do tell tales…

Run, Don’t Walk
More science suggesting movement is key to health in later life.

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