17 April, 2019 – Episode 717 – Keeping Science Alive!

April 18th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

First Heart?, Only Mostly Dead!, CBD Cures, Microbial Bowels, Fire Ant Soap Opera, Sea Spider Legs, Coral Reef Screens, Exoplanet Life, Baby Molecule, Deep AI, Bio Machines, Pond Life, Ancient Pee, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

The following science news program is brought to you by people like you…
More specifically by people like Andy Grow.
People who not just enjoy learning about science, but understand the importance of it to our everyday lives…
People like Andy Grow.
People who support science based shows and science based policy making…
People like Andy Grow.
And while we have lots of choices to make when it comes to how, when and where we spend our time in this life…
we here at TWiS are always happy to spend that time with you…
And Andy Grow…
Here on This Week in Science,
Andy Grow edition,
Coming Up Next…

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

First Heart?
Bioprinting is full of promise for future medical needs, and that future might be rapidly on its way. Researchers in regenerative engineering in Tel Aviv have successfully bioprinted the world’s first 3-dimensional, vascularized human heart using a patient’s cells. The only problems are that it is only about as big as a rabbit’s heart, and the cells don’t beat together like they should.

Only Mostly Dead!
Yale researchers report keeping pig brains alive several hours after decapitation the the journal Nature using their BrainEx perfusion system.

CBD Trojan Horse
A possible path past the blood-brain barrier with cannabidiol.

Irritable bowel microbiome correlation
The condition is 80% predictable based on bacteria that are present in the gut.

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Fire ant society is complicated…
There can be one queen, or many, but the girls know what’s best in either case.

Sea spider legs are like swiss cheese
No, they aren’t nutty and creamy (I mean, they might be, I’ve never tasted one…), but they are full of holes.

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This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“So my doctor recently said that I needed to talk to a cardiologist. He said that I needed to get an angiogram to find out if I had any heart blockages. I was in and out within 8 hours and went to work the next day. The results of the angio said that we probably need to go in and do a triple bypass. So, we’re setting up everything with my insurance company to take care of the triple bypass.
I work part-time at minimum wage and I absolutely do not have a company health plan. And while medical science is doing all the heavy lifting there is another kind of science is paying for it. Thanks to the affordable health care plan I have medical insurance for one of the few times in my life. Thanks to the state of California I have Medi-Cal because my income isn’t sufficient to warrant me paying for insurance. And say what you like about it I find the coverage is vastly superior to every other medical plan I’ve ever had.
So, what has political science done for me lately? In the stroke of a pen I’ll be able to get my heart repaired and recover and even work casually because of medical science and have it all paid for through the taxes I’ve been putting in all my life.
–Tedward”

Let’s continue with Some More Science News From This Week in Science

Coral reef quick screening via environmental DNA
Just a cup full of water can relate important ecological information.

Radiating Life
Researchers looking at potential radiation exposure on the likeliest exoplanet candidates for life found that life could definitely abide what is being dealt by the frequent flares from the stars they orbit.

Earth-Sized Exoplanet
NASA’s TESS satellite has discovered its first Earth-sized exoplanet along with a sub-Neptune-sized gas giant orbiting a star called HD21749. The system lies about 53 light years from Earth.

Tatooine Planet Finding
A new planet orbiting the Kepler 47 binary star system otherwise known as Tatooine was confirmed.

The universe’s first baby molecule has been found
HeH

AI For Folding, AI For Fusion
AI deep learning networks hold promise for numerous scientific areas.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Biological Machines
Using DNA as a base material, Cornell researchers are creating machines with life-like properties.

More like the primordial amuse bouche?
Life is likely to have originated in ponds, not the ocean.

Archeology… of ancient pee

Sharks are afraid of orcas, elephant seals win

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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10 April, 2019 – Episode 716 – Seeing the Hole Thing

April 11th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Seeing A Hole, Autism Treatment Success?, More New Humans!, Screwy Sperm, Cricket Aging, Batty Lives, Chinese Monkey Brains, Metal Asteroids, What You Eat, Cat Understanding, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

Caution!
It’s that thing you use when crossing a busy intersection.
That instinct to look both ways.
That native navigator in your head that whispers warnings when the future seems uncertain
Ignore it for a moment…
Because ahead there are certainties that no amount of caution can prevent.
Ahead there is a journey, an adventure and a mystery to be un-veiled…
That no amount of hesitation can predict.
Ahead there is only discovery.
Discovery that will change everything you thought you knew about the future and the past…
Discovery that will challenge who we think we are and what we thought we were capable of…
The sort of life changing discovery that is never temporary and yet only possible in the present moment…
And caution free discovery is just the sort of thing we promise provide here on…
This Week in Science,
Coming Up Next…

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Seeing A Hole
An international collaboration networked telescopes from around the world to create a virtual telescope the size of the Earth with sufficient resolution to image a black hole. That image of M87 was released today.

Autism Treatment Success?
Two years after treating a cohort of autistic children with fecal transplants to improve their gut microbiomes, the children are still seeing improvements in their symptoms and showing a change from their original microbial make-up.

More new humans!
Bones found in a cave in the Philippines might represent another species of early hominid.

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

“Getting screwed” takes on a whole new meaning
Screw shaped sperm swim better and faster, but appear to be more susceptible to damange, which explains why we don’t see this shape in all sperm. More research is needed!

“You make me feel so young…”
Crickets age slower when females are plentiful. Is it because sex is good for you? Because males are too busy to fight? Or because there is simply less competition?

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“My wife often tells me to shorten my time in the shower, but I enjoy a
nice shower. Her theory is that we shouldn’t waste energy, but my
supposition is that if I’m enjoying it maybe it’s not a waste?

It’s hard to know how to feel without data though.

A friend of mine told me that I should just look at my gas meter and see
how much gas I was using. I did that, but knowing how many cubic meters
of natural gas I burned didn’t give me any intuition about if it was a
lot or not.

(Apologies for the metric measurements here. It’s certainly easier for
calculations. Also I live in the Netherlands, where we use a civilized
measurement system instead of camel-force per cubit or however you
measure natural gas at residences in the USA these days.)

Quick Internet searching was not super helpful, but I did find out that
natural gas is mostly methane and has a mass of about 0.7 to 0.9 kg per
m³. I realized that I remembered enough high school chemistry to figure
out that methane (CH?) has a mass of about 16 and carbon dioxide (CO?)
about 44, so I could do some simple multiplication and figure out how
many kilograms of carbon dioxide I was emitting per shower.

A little more math and it turns out that when I shower daily it emits
about 210 kilograms of CO? in a year. Putting that into perspective,
that’s about the same as burning 105 liters of gasoline (or, as Justin
would say, “”about 105 thousand milliliters of gasoline””; something like
28 gallons for Americans).

Anyway, thanks to science I can now shower guilt-free, without a care
for my carbon footprint. Well, if not exactly guilt-free, at least with
an amount of guilt put into the proper perspective.

And that’s what science has done for me lately.

Cheers,
–Shane”

Let’s continue with Some More Science News From This Week in Science

How to be of the planet
Native American inscriptions found in Alabama cave shed light on Cherokee people affected by American colonization.

Stimulating Memories
Non-invasive brain stimulation makes old brains as good at remembering information as young brains. Sign me up!

Living longer
It’s a batty idea.

Chinese Monkey Brains
Researchers in China have edited human genes for brain development into monkeys, and the results suggest that it made the monkeys a bit smarter.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Metal Asteroids
New research suggests that they might have volcanoes, and we’re sending a mission to an asteroid called Psyche that could determine whether this is true.

What You Eat
May impact the effectiveness of your immune system.

Cats hear you, and understand you.
They just don’t care…

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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03 April, 2019 – Episode 715 – Live From The Alberta Rose in Portland!

April 9th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Fishy Fossils, Music Against Mosquitoes, Sweat Secrets, Fish Mucus Medicine, Denisovans Did It, Skinky Brethren, Slumber Parties!, Interview with Dr. Allison Coffin, A Metric Poo Ton, Deadly Bird Cities, Animal Relaxation, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

Humans.
We’ve all seen them.
Delightful and despicable as the hairless apes may be…

It’s difficult to imagine the world of today without them.

Yes, they are the ones responsible for global warming, deforestation, de-speciation,
and are the second most prolific polluters the planet has ever produced…

First prize of course going to the microbes which introduced the toxin Oxygen to the environment…
And in such quantities as to bring about the neoproterozoic oxygenation event
AKA the first mass extinction of life on earth as well as bring about a common mainstay in modern respiration…

And though a 2.5 billion year old end of the world event…
was not the end of the world.

We currently living hairless apes should take heed!

While we may consider the earth a safe place, a settled argument,
a steady rock upon which to colonize our civilization…
It is not.
Eventually there comes a change.
And change isn’t a good thing or a bad thing, it’s just change…

But being that mostly hairless apes mostly have an interest in prolonging a changeless existence
we bring you a few of the lessons we have learned over the last 2.5 billion years here on

This week in science
Coming up next…

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Fishy Fossils
A paper out in PNAS reports evidence found in North Dakota of what might have happened in the hours following the Chixulub asteroid impact 65 million years ago tat wiped out 75% of life on land.

Music Against Mosquitoes
Turns out they don’t like Skrillex.

Sweat Secrets
Another study discovered that lactic acid in our sweat is what they really like.

Turning fish mucus into medicine
The slimy coating has antimicrobial properties that could benefit people, too!

Denisovans did it with humans…
way more recently than we might have thought

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

The oddest of brethren
One brother was live born, the other from an egg. No, it’s not an Aesop’s fable, it’s nature! So weird…

Slumber parties for pups
helter dogs show a significant drop in stress from just one weekend away. so… DON’T MIND ME IMMA JUST ADOPT A MILLION SHELTER PUPPIES SHUT UP KAREN STOP LOOKING AT ME.

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This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

This week, we asked for audience members at our live theater show to share what science has done for them lately on 3×5 cards. We picked a few and read them aloud. The real-time interaction and diversity of responses was illuminating. Thanks to all who passed a card forward!

Who did we interview this week?

Our guest this week was Dr. Allison Coffin!
Dr. Coffin is an Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Washington State University, Vancouver. She uses fish to study the causes of hearing loss with the goal that it will lead to future treatments. She loves to talk about science and help others improve how they communicate their research so much that she helped found an organization for professional science communicators called Science Talk.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

A Metric Poo Ton
Actually, 66 tons of human poo may soon be released on the tallest North American mountain, Denali in Alaska, thanks to warming temperatures. Add this to the corpses on Everest, and extreme hiking is turning into a house of horrors.

Deadly Bird cities
Chicago is among the top three cities in North America for bird deaths: Combine the facts that it lies along a major migratory flyway, is a big population center, and has lots of lights, and you get a recipe for disaster for birds.

Why does a dog sit, and a pig lay? How do you relax?
The answer may have to do with your size (if we were all different species, of course).

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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27 March, 2019 – Episode 714 – What is the End?

March 28th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Interview w/ Dr. Katie Mack On Astrophysics, Brain Cells For Bob?, Exercise Factors, 5-Year Plan, Babysitter Benefits, Scuba Diving Lizards, Big Ol T Rex, Lamb Bag Update, Over-Interpretation Hallucination, Evolution Constraints, Cancer Trees, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

The following program is not for the weak of mind,
The bereft of imagination,
Or the willfully ignorant.
If you consider yourself to be amongst any of those groups…
You probably are not…
as they never would be so self aware as to think so…
If you are the adventuring sort…
an adventure here awaits!
As we go exploring into the unknown…
Following in intrepid footsteps of scientists the world over…
and occasionally wandering off the path into the wilds of speculation of unknowns yet unknown.
There are few destinations we have not dared to delve into
Subjects from Astronomy to zoology
Why the number of knowledge navigations we have neglected to navigate number in the…
Well it’s still a really big number…
there’s more to know then can fit in a human skull…
And on every extro-skullular adventure we venture together…
Here on This Week In Science,
Coming Up Next!

Who did we interview this week?

Interview with Dr. Katie Mack:
Dr. Mack is a theoretical astrophysicist who studies the universe from beginning to end, focusing on a number of questions in topics like dark matter, galaxy formation, cosmic strings, and more. She is working on a book that is due to be published in 2020, called The End of Everything, and she recently published a study on micro-black holes.

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“What has Science done for me lately?
I could not sleep at all Sunday night/Monday morning. Back itched. At 5:30
AM, went on line to see if I could make an appointment. I did with my
regular doctor as their website said he had a 9:30am opening. The
amount of technology behind that simple transaction from my computer,
the router, the modem, hundreds or more miles of infrastructure, their
server, their appointment database and its connection to the public web
SECURELY (i hope), and all the myriad of protocols needed to do that,

So, I went to the doctor and took the time to ask if the itching on the back
of my skull was related as I assumed it was. Nope, he uses a $64 dollar
word that I can’t remember and said my follicles are infected. I walked
out of there with a pill prescription for the itch as I am NOT going to
turn into a contortionist to apply cream on my back. I didn’t even have
to ask him as he figured that out immediately. I also got another pill
and this weird shampoo for the scalp. All in less then five or so hours
of deciding to see him.

Even five years ago, I probably would have had to spend an hour or two
on the phone trying to get an appointment or just go to the expensive
emergency room. When it works, Technology is great.

Science drives technology which drives science which drives technology
which drives ….

In the Lab I work for, nearly every major machine is a
robot of some sort and has been for decades. The GC machines self
inject all the samples, clean the needles, etc all by themselves. GC is
Gas chromatography and the only time you ever hear that is when someone
is explaining what GC means. Without the robots there, you’d
need three times the people, have 20 times the mistakes humans are not
consistent, and run three shifts a say to do what we do now. All that
tech does science. And science is what led directly to all that tech
being created.

We have at least half a dozen of these going all the time in our Durham
office but we print to a PDF file these days, not a dot matrix printer.
–David Eckard”

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Brain Cells For Bob?
A new study looks at several methods of human brain preservation and finds evidence of neurogenesis depends on how tissue was stored after death. While far from the final evidence needed to confirm whether or not human brains continue to grow new brain cells throughout life, this study could at least create standards for future research.

Exercise Factors
And, a mouse study finds that factors released by platelets stimulate neurogenesis at low levels. Could such factors be at play in people, too?

Mike Pence thinks he is smarter than NASA
And, told them to get back to the moon in 5 years.

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

You won’t help me with the kids? You’re killing me here!
Assistance in raising offspring could extend life expectancy in birds. So that’s another reason to pick the kids up from school and let mom take the afternoon off.

Scuba Diving Lizard
No tank or certification required.

Big Ol T Rex
He’s a big, mean, eatin’-machine – and it only took 20 years to figure that out! Because he was also dirty…

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Lamb Bag
Update A synthetic womb shown previously to support late-term fetal sheep, was recently domonstrated to maintain pre-term sheep equivalent to a 24-week old human fetus.

Over-Interpretation Hallucination
Lack of information reaching the visual cortex might be responsible for the brain over-interpreting what it does receive and creating hallucinations.

Evolution of the youngest
The younger a species the more opportunity for evolution.

Cancer Trees
Cancer doesn’t grow on trees, but maybe trees can tell us things about cancer.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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20 March, 2019 – Episode 713 – Fishing for Science?

March 21st, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

An Interview w/ Dr. Chris Donnelly on ALS & proteins, Magnetic Brains, Mini-Brains, God & Society, Bird Poop, Old Sperm, Asteroids, Grey Goo, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

It’s all in your head.
What am I talking about?
Everything.
Everything that is or isn’t real.
Everything that is or isn’t possible.
Everything that has ever happened or will ever happen.
Is all in your head.
Yes, there is a world on the other side of the skull wall that goes on regardless of what’s going on inside…
But as far as you go,
nothing comes closer to the reality of your existence than that which takes place between your ears.
And if you happen to be a scientist…
or wish to think like one…
The most intuitive instinct you must overcome…
Is trusting what is in your head.
The most important training you will ever undertake..
Is learning to trust what is on the other side…
While this traditionally takes oodles of hours of patient practice
We have devised a method to accelerate the process.
An injection of scientifically formulated information applied directly to your ear holes
That we call
This Week in Science.
Coming up Next…

Who did we interview this week?

Dr. Christopher Donnelly is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Scientific Director of the LiveLikeLou Center for ALS Research in the University of Pittsburgh Brain Institute. His studies are focused on the biology underlying neurodegenerative diseases with a particular interest in understanding neuronal death observed in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD).

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“Ok I’ve got one, it may be slightly embarrassing but it’s for science that I tell my tale.

This is kind of a life hack I made up.

Run out of deodorant? Caught out on a busy day? You’ve been running hither and yon and notice you stink ! No problem, hand sanitizer, it’s small and you can carry it in your bag also it’s everywhere on desk and in public bathrooms. What science has done for me is taught me that underarm stink comes from bacteria eating and pooping. The hand sanitizer kills the things making the smell under your arms its almost instantly. That beats any deodorant I’ve every heard of or used.
–Beth Gilmore”

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Birds & Humans Do It?
Do humans detect the Earth’s magnetic fields? A new study suggests our brains may respond to this signal even though we aren’t aware of it. But, how?

Mini Brains Are Amazing
Brain organoids composed of human brain cells grown from stem cells by researchers in the UK spontaneously connected to mouse spinal cord neurons and enabled muscle contraction. The system contracted spontaneously, but irregularly.

Where gods are made
In already complex societies!

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Bird poop: it does a coral good.
The missing piece of the puzzle in recovering coral reefs was there all along, right above us. No, don’t look up KAREN, OH NO, NOW IT’S ON YOUR FACE. LOOK WHAT YOU DID…

Very old sperm
Ahhh. Still good.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Asteroids!
Science is getting really good at this game of asteroids with a bunch of data coming in this week about Ryugu and Bennu.

Grey Goo?
Not quite yet, but researchers are developing what they call “particle robots”.

And, a virus sheds light on ancient human population movements.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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13 March, 2019 – Episode 712 – Daylight Science Time!

March 14th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Spending Cuts For Science, Mammoth Mouse, Art Rocks, Transient Anatomy, Horseshoe Spiders, Festival Henge, Dusty Space, Pain Pits?, Controlling Birth Control, Allergy Meds, Physics Combs, Work Gratitude, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

People have opinions about everything.
And while deep learning algorithms set to work on determining how often those opinions turn out to represent reality throughout history are either still running with no end in sight…
Or, have crashed due to human programming errors…
Preliminary data suggests that in general…
humans are no more accurate at forming opinions that represent reality at age 8 than they are at age 80…
And, even this was far below the threshold of coin flipping between the actual answer and utter nonsense.
(seven year old opinions were excluded from the study because of their uncanny ability to recognize nonsense…
and, by elimination, choose the correct answer every time.)
The following program is designed to assist in disregarding human opinions about how the world works.
By listening carefully you will accumulate the knowledge required to deflect erroneous opinions in favor of super awesome facts…
If you listen carelessly you might get some things wrong, but you’ll still be well ahead of the average human.
We offer this service free of charge because we too understand what it’s like to be curious about reality in a sea of self-deluding human opinions…
And in our sometimes less than humble opinion,
there is no better way to stay above the opinionated fray than…
This Week in Science,
Coming Up Next…

What Are This Week’s Top Stories?

Spending Cuts For Science
The Trump administration’s proposed budget for 2020 is full of massive cuts for federally funded science.

Mammoth Mouse
Researchers were able to get nuclei from 24,000 year old mammoth cells to partially activate when put inside mouse oocytes.

Ancient art reveals origin of “stork” theory on where babies come from…
… or, it’s suggestive of early communication efforts by humans.

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Ah, the transient anus
Ctenophores answer the age old question, why poop? And from where? And how??

Horseshoe crabs are not crabs
They are indeed, arachnids!

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“Hi Kiki,
My “WHSDFML” is more What Has Science Done for a Stranger Lately.

I have been on the non-profit bone marrow donor registry from BeTheMatch.org for 9 years. Last month, I donated peripheral blood stem cells for a person who I matched with, a patient with ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukemia). This is often the last resort for someone battling this disease. It was a simple process with (for me) zero side effects other than the wonderful feeling that SCIENCE has discovered a simple and effective method that let me give a stranger another shot at life.

The standard method of blood stem cell donation used to be bone marrow aspiration, where the cells are obtained by drilling into a bone and sucking out marrow. Needless to say, this life-saving process is painful, invasive, and requires significant recovery. SCIENTISTS developed a drug to help stimulate blood stem cells in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, and realized it was also a good way to stimulate bone stem cell production in donor patients.

After 5 days of injections with this medication, my white blood cell count was high enough to have the blood stem cells harvested through aphoresis, similar to platelet collection. A small amount of blood was removed, the desired cells harvested, and the remainder blood was put back. After a few hours enough cells were harvested to be able to repopulate the recipient’s entire blood system. I felt totally normal two days later, after essentially providing a life-saving organ transplant.

I encourage all TWIS listeners to sign up to be on the registry. Donor blood stem cells are used to treat many different, mostly life-threatening diseases. It is quite rare to match with a patient, so I feel particularly lucky to have been able to do this for another person. Check out BeTheMatch.org to learn how to get on the registry.
Thank you to the three of you for bringing amazing science to the spotlight every week.

Kindest regards, Ashleigh”

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Stonehenge Mystery SOLVED!
again…

Dusty Space
Turns out there are dust rings around the sun that follow the paths of the inner planets. Perhaps they will tell us about our solar system.

Anti-inflammatory Avocado Pits
Don’t eat avocado pits, but maybe look forward to medicines based on their anti-inflammatory powers.

Birth control Not Working?
Some women have a gene that helps hormone breakdown, and could explain why birth control doesn’t work for everyone.

Allergic To Meds?
The extra stuff in medication could be causing you trouble.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

The scientific way to comb hair Start at the end of course!
Thanks physics?

Be Grateful…
At work!

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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06 March, 2019 – Episode 711 – Probiotics for Corals?

March 7th, 2019
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What is in the This Week in Science Podcast?

Interview w/ Dr. Raquel Peixoto – Coral Probiotics, HIV Cured?, Regeneration Genes, Sound Mass, Spider Ants, Dolphin Dating, Wiki World, Dinosaur Disaster, Walking Accidents, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from TWIS, the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

We live in interesting times…
Not that other times weren’t equally as interesting…
But it is a specifically interesting time if you happen to be a human.
For one…
Humans weren’t always around.
So, just being on the planet now is in and of itself an interesting thing.
For another…
Despite all of the interesting times in which there were humans on the planet…
This time is perhaps the most interesting.
Not because humans are in and of them selves more interesting now than in humans past…
But because our access to interesting information is greater than at any other time in human history…
And this,
as it turns out,
means that times are likely to just keep getting more interesting as time goes by.
Making this moment just a little less interesting than the next one to come…
Or in this case,
the moments spent listening to a protracted show intro will be a lot less interesting than…
This Week in Science
Coming Up Next…

An Interview with Dr. Raquel Peixoto

Dr. Peixoto is a visiting assistant professor at UC Davis from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a research associate from the Rio de Janeiro Marine Aquarium (AquaRio) in Brazil. She also coordinates the Beneficial Microorganisms of Marine Organisms (BMMO) Network, which seeks to unify and facilitate studies on the manipulation of the microbiome associated with marine organisms. She spoke with TWIS about her research, and how much we have yet to learn about corals and their microbiomes.

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“I just listened to you read the letter from the person who has started a business getting brains from people who have donated their body to science to researchers.

My Dad recently passed away due to complications from cancer. He never went to college and spent his career as an electrician, but he never stopped learning. In his retirement, he was always reading science magazines, listening to talks from Neil deGrasse Tyson, and read Stephen Hawking’s “A Brief History of Time.” He had a closet full of science t-shirts, and loved talking science so much that in a doctor’s office one day, a person he was chatting with asked if he was a retired physics professor because of knowledge that my blue-collar dad had learned. The connection back to your previous letter is that my Dad did donate his body to science, and it brought us so much peace when she received notice from the local university that they had accepted his body into their program. Thank you science for giving my Dad a passion in his retirement and for giving us peace when one of his final wishes was fulfilled.
-tb
Todd Biske”

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Two Points
A second HIV-patient appears to have been cured of infection by a stem cell transplant to treat lymphoma. Two point make a line, but is it enough to indicate a trend?

Perfectly Paired
By comparing human and axolotl genes for regeneration, it turns out that the genes are the same, but the pairings are different.

Grow A Head
Worm studies determined that regenerative abilities can be gained, not just evolutionarily lost.

Big beats may have gravity?
The idea of sound having properties of a particle, the phonon, just added some evidentiary weight.

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Are you a spider, or are you just happy to see me?
Jumping spiders that mimic ants have puzzling methods of being seen by the opposite sex.

Dolphin girls like their dudes to bro it out for a while
Dolphin bros that hang out in bachelor pods have greater breeding success once it is time.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

Wikipedia searches tell tales
The frequency and timing of Wikipedia searches on native species may be a secret back-end version of citizen science!

Dinosaur Decline?
Hardly. It seems they were doing just fine, thriving even, prior to being decimated by an asteroid strike. Be thankful for today, folks.

A Reason to Stay in?
Elder dog walking linked to bone fractures.

If You love TWIS, and all the science news we bring you each week, please consider making a donation to the This Week in Science podcast.

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27 February, 2019 – Episode 710 – This Week in Science Podcast (TWIS)

March 1st, 2019
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What is in This Week in Science?

Interview w/ Drs. Konstantin Batygin & Mike Brown About Planet 9, Thank The Clouds, CO2 Into Coal?, CBD From Yeast, Repellent Stripes, BIRDS ARE SMART, “Flying Bulldog” Rediscovered, Sweet And Sour, Abundant Life, And Much More…

Want to listen to a particular story from the This Week in Science podcast? You can do that here. Just look for the time-code link in the description.

DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER, DISCLAIMER!!!

Say you want to say something that sums up everything that is known about a subject…
The easier a time you have doing so the less we likely understand about the thing you are summing up…
In fact there are few things worth thinking about that can be summed up succinctly.
There are just too many things we do not understand well enough
to say anything meaningful about them without leading us to more questions.
Which is fine…
it’s the way it has always been.
It is a big wonder filled world out there…
But there comes a time from time to time when humans attempt make demands of the universe…
To tell a story that sums it all up,
a text shall we say,
that summarizes the universe into chapters and verse…
As if to say…
Everything that is not understood by this time tomorrow…
does not exist!
This occasional human tendency to end the pursuit of knowledge
has come and gone and lingered lavishly throughout history…
But there is one place where the pursuit of new knowledge never rests…
Where wondering humans are never satisfactorily silenced by answers…
A place where the next question and not the last conclusion gets pulses pounding…
And that place is right here on
This Week in Science
Coming Up Next

An Interview with Drs. Konstantin Batygin & Mike Brown

Dr. Konstantin Batygin is an Assistant Professor of Planetary Science & Van Nuys Page Scholar in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. Also at the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Mike Brown is the Richard and Barbara Rosenberg Professor of Planetary Astronomy. With his Twitter handle @PlutoKiller, you may know him from the role he played in demoting Pluto’s status as a planet and his book, “How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming”. We are thrilled to have them on the show to discuss their latest paper suggesting a path to discovering the so-called Planet 9… welcome to the show!

Support us on Patreon!

This Week in What Has Science Done for me Lately?!?

“Greetings TWIS team from warm sunny Florida. I was fortunate to learn of TWIS after hearing Kirsten plug it on another science show recently and I must admit that I’m really digging your work! That being said, I was saddened to listen to a recent episode in which there was no listener participation for the segment “What Has Science Done For Me Lately”? So here is my first contribution. It is not ground breaking or revolutionary but it did ignite a supernova within my heart and mind.

I am a proud science geek and father of four young sons who runs a high complex laboratory. To break-up the monotony of my work week I often go for walks through a nearby county park that meanders through several different Florida ecosystems. Even though I am currently “”trapped”” in the lab I am still a field biologist at heart, so when I come across something interesting (various herpetiles, insects, shore birds, feathers, seed pods, etc) I will often snap a photo or bring home a specimen to share with my boys. Such was the case yesterday when I happened upon a large perfectly intact horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) molt!

Immediately I thought of my boys and wondered how they would react to my not uncommon but still strange find. When I arrived home from work I let them know that I had a science surprise to show them after dinner. The boys were supper excited. I thought they may even get a little scared when they saw what appeared to be a bizarre alien creature from some SciFi movie, but I was pleasantly surprised to see their eyes light up with interest as I pulled the shell from its box. They couldn’t wait to run their hands over its smooth surface and gently touch the many spines.

They thought it was an animal and were a little sad that it had died, but I took the moment as an opportunity to give a quick lesson on some differences between how invertebrates with exoskeletons and vertebrates with endoskeletons, such as themselves, grow. Then I explained how this was just a shedding and that as the horseshoe crab grows it has to molt; I pointed out the open seam in the front of the carapace were the living animal had crawled it’s way out and then explained how it’s “skin” would then harden to form a new shell. What happened next blew me away!

When the mini lesson was over, my 4 year old son Emmett looked up at me, his green eyes huge and full of wonder. Then with the biggest smile he ran around the table, wrapped his arms around my legs and said thank you Daddy!

So, What Has Science Done For Me Lately? It rewarded me with a beautiful memory of sharing a love for science with my children along with one very large, totally genuine and unsolicited hug from my very special little man!

I am looking forward to many new episodes of TWIS and catching up on all those archived goodies. Thank you!
Best,
Seth in St. Pete”

And, NOW, Some Science News From This Week in Science

Thank The Clouds
Marine stratocumulous clouds are responsible for a significant amount of atmospheric cooling. A new model solves an apparent mismatch between historic CO2 levels and temperature, and suggests new targets for concern in climate change.

CO2 Into Coal?
It’s still a long way from implementable, but chemists have managed to produce an efficient

CBD from yeast
Weed is on its way to becoming pharmaceutically produced.

Blair’s Animal Corner!… with Blair!

Fly-repelling nature of zebra stripes: confirmed!
How else, but by dressing up horses as zebras?? I LOVE SCIENCE.

BIRDS ARE SMART
Could you master a shell game? This African Grey could.

And, finally, Some Quick Science News Stories To End The Show

“Flying Bulldog” Rediscovered
This humongous bee resurfaced this week – proving they are alive and well!

Sweet And Sour
The tastes of citrus fruits and the color of petunias have a genetic commonality that turns a proton pump on or off to sequester protons within cells. More protons mean higher acidity and a redder color.

Israeli Mission Glitch
The private Israeli mission to the moon has suffered an unexplained glitch that may affect the craft’s ability to rendezvous with the moon.

Life is abundant…
… in places we have just begun to look

If You love TWIS, please consider making a donation to This Week in Science below.

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